Battle of Britain Memorial Flight

Oh, My!

They were the words uttered by the new Princess as she surveyed the throngs of well-wishers that were assembled outside the palace gates. The networks had their lip-readers, but even those without that talent, like myself, could easily add the text to the image.

It was a crowd as large, and as well-behaved, as any of the Tea Party rallies. The similarities do not end there. This was pure, unabashed patriotism. Even those who are indifferent, or opposed, to the concept of a monarchy could not deny that there was a feel-good factor about the whole affair.

While a sentimental outpouring is largely expected from the inhabitants of ‘middle England’, the folk from the traditionally less enthusiastic regions of Britain joined in the festivities. The flags of Scotland, Wales and Cornwall mingled with the thousands of Union Flags… not to mention the representatives of former colonies that, over the centuries, have not always enjoyed an affaire de coeur with royalty. Remember George III?

While the day was hailed as an indication of the ‘modernization’ of the monarchy, becoming more ‘in-touch’ with the people, thankfully it was totally devoid of the fake political correctness that infests so many state occasions. It was perfectly acceptable to fly national flags, sing patriotic songs and marvel at the fly-past of the ‘Battle of Britain Memorial Flight’ (a Lancaster, Hurricane and Spitfire for you aviation freaks), a reminder of ‘Britain’s finest hour’. It was closely followed by four jet fighters in formation which, I wondered, were perhaps the last four after swathes of defense cuts!

No mention of the EU, of globalization, or multi-denominationalism. The joy of the cartwheeling vicar (sure to become a YouTube hit) could be taken as a celebration that the Anglican Church is still the official state religion of England, despite the attempts of a certain ethnic group to create their own religious courts within the realm. It was ironic that the Abbey proceedings were conducted by an Archbishop who showed some approval for that idea.

The day had some detractors, claiming that the extra public holiday created a loss in production that far exceeded the gains in revenue through tourism and associated paraphernalia. In challenging economic times, that’s fair comment. But you can’t fix a price tag on patriotism, tradition, pride and morale. If the billions of dollars (or pounds) spent can restore these feelings to a disillusioned nation, it’s money well used.

So what can America learn from this? Well, although there is no monarchy, we have our own ‘royalty’. The Founders and The Constitution are the basis of this country, along with the Judeo-Christian principles that inspired them. Don’t let the progressives stifle that message with their treasonous slander. Be proud of your heritage and the traditions that exist in this still relatively young country. Keep your faith in God and protect the Constitution at all costs.

If we follow these simple rules, the United States that we know and love will last as long as, or longer than, the British monarchy.

(Editor Dee is in for Skip today)

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